A Radical Place

2012 Borderline Figures

Berlin. A city where the hypothesis that we can all be borderline figures stands feasible.
In 2011, Berlin Explore worked on orally documenting East-West Berlin’s division history and German people’s experience involving North Korea, under the overarching topic of Donghwan Jo, Haejun Jo and Korea’s North-South division. On a continued note, we wish to raise the following concrete questions on Why the locality of Berlin is a Radical Place in relation to Korea’s political, historical and social context, through Jaewoo Oh’s new works.
The Korean artist invited to 2012’s A Radical Place is Jaewoo Oh. In Berlin, Jaewoo Oh illuminates how national ideology and law influences individual lives by collaborating with a literary author, focusing on Du-Yul Song’s book “Borderline figure”. Professor Du-Yul Song, a Germanist, has attracted the German media’s attention by being deported from Korea due to ideological issues.
Jaewoo Oh reinterprets how individual sovereignty is sacrificed within the contemporary state’s power structure not from a nation-central but individual-focused perspective, through Du-Yul Song’s personal history as described in “Borderline Figure.”
The democratic state, born from the modern society, guarantees individual sovereignty by law- however, with the advent of an exceptional circumstance called “security law” amidst the ideological conflict between South and North Korea, Du-Yul Song’s personal history was victimized by the two incompatible national structures. Berlin, the center of Germany’s history of division, is still a “radical” place for Koreans (us) to whom territorial and ideological division is still in a present-progressive mode. In this regard, despite the fact that we are all guaranteed our sovereignty under Korea’s democratic administration, we are all in a state where we may become “borderline figures” - people whose right cannot be upheld - under the special condition we find in Berlin.

2012 Borderline Figures

Berlin. A city where the hypothesis that we can all be borderline figures stands feasible.
In 2011, Berlin Explore worked on orally documenting East-West Berlin’s division history and German people’s experience involving North Korea, under the overarching topic of Donghwan Jo, Haejun Jo and Korea’s North-South division. On a continued note, we wish to raise the following concrete questions on Why the locality of Berlin is a Radical Place in relation to Korea’s political, historical and social context, through Jaewoo Oh’s new works.
The Korean artist invited to 2012’s A Radical Place is Jaewoo Oh. In Berlin, Jaewoo Oh illuminates how national ideology and law influences individual lives by collaborating with a literary author, focusing on Du-Yul Song’s book “Borderline figure”. Professor Du-Yul Song, a Germanist, has attracted the German media’s attention by being deported from Korea due to ideological issues.
Jaewoo Oh reinterprets how individual sovereignty is sacrificed within the contemporary state’s power structure not from a nation-central but individual-focused perspective, through Du-Yul Song’s personal history as described in “Borderline Figure.”
The democratic state, born from the modern society, guarantees individual sovereignty by law- however, with the advent of an exceptional circumstance called “security law” amidst the ideological conflict between South and North Korea, Du-Yul Song’s personal history was victimized by the two incompatible national structures. Berlin, the center of Germany’s history of division, is still a “radical” place for Koreans (us) to whom territorial and ideological division is still in a present-progressive mode. In this regard, despite the fact that we are all guaranteed our sovereignty under Korea’s democratic administration, we are all in a state where we may become “borderline figures” - people whose right cannot be upheld - under the special condition we find in Berlin.